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Your search for South China Sea found 54 results.

South China Sea US Policy Options
/reports/2014/south-china-sea-us-policy-options
The aim of this report is to propose additional policy options that the United States might pursue in the South China Sea. To this end it provides a detailed recounting of existing U.S. policy toward the South China Sea. It concludes by recommending additional policy approaches aimed toward generating a more peaceful, stable, non- confrontational, law abiding environment in the South China Sea. Along the way it will address the U.S. interests that are involved in the South China Sea. It will briefly explain what international laws apply to the South China Sea, and detail the “rules” that Washington’s policy insists all parties follow. It will then provide an overview of the legal merits of the respective claims to the islands and features in the South China Sea. The legal overview is presented not to argue for a change to existing U.S. policy of not taking a position on sovereignty claims, but to provide policy-makers with some understanding of the legal complexity of the claims issue.
South China Sea US Policy Options The South China Sea: Assessing U.S. Policy and Options for the Future The aim of this report is to propose additional policy options that the United States might pursue in the South China Sea. To this end it provides a detailed recounting of existing U.S. policy toward the South China Sea. It concludes by recommending additional policy approaches aimed toward generating a more peaceful, stable, non- confrontational, law abiding environment in the South China Sea. Along the way it will address the U.S. interests that are involved in the South China Sea
Philippine Claims in South China Sea
/reports/2014/philippine-claims-in-south-china-sea
This is the third of three legal analyses commissioned as part of a project entitled “U.S. Policy Options in the South China Sea.” Experienced U.S. international lawyers, such as Captain Mark Rosen, Judge Advocate General’s Corps, USN (ret.),1 the author of this analysis, were asked to test the various legal arguments that Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines make in support of their claims, weigh them against the body of international case law associated with maritime disputes of this sort, and, if possible, reach a judgment on which country’s claim is superior. Importantly, this analysis of Philippine claims to Scarborough Shoal and features in the Spratly archipelago was not undertaken as a prelude to a recommendation that the United States depart from its long-held position of not taking a position on competing sovereignty claims in the South China Sea. That is not the intent of the project; nor is it one of the recommendations.
Philippine Claims in South China Sea Philippine Claims in the South China Sea: A Legal Analysis This is the third of three legal analyses commissioned as part of a project entitled “U.S. Policy Options in the South China Sea.” Experienced U.S. international lawyers, such as Captain Mark Rosen, Judge Advocate General’s Corps, USN (ret.),1 the author of this analysis, were asked to test the various ... was not undertaken as a prelude to a recommendation that the United States depart from its long-held position of not taking a position on competing sovereignty claims in the South China Sea
China versus Vietnam
/reports/2014/china-versus-vietnam
This legal analysis was commissioned as part of a project entitled, “U.S. policy options in the South China Sea.” The objective in asking experienced U.S international lawyers, such as Captain Raul “Pete” Pedrozo, USN, Judge Advocate Corps (ret.), the author of this analysis, is to provide U.S. policy makers access to work that tests the various legal arguments that the respective claimants make in support of their claims, and weigh them against the relatively limited body of international case law associated with maritime disputes of this sort. Importantly, this analysis of Vietnamese claims versus Chinese claims to the Paracel and Spratly archipelagoes was not undertaken as a prelude to a recommendation that the United States depart from its long held position of not taking a position on competing sovereignty claims in the South China Sea. That is not the intent, nor is it one of the recommendations of the project.
China versus Vietnam China versus Vietnam: An Analysis of the Competing Claims in the South China Sea This legal analysis was commissioned as part of a project entitled, “U.S. policy options in the South China Sea.” The objective in asking experienced U.S international lawyers, such as Captain Raul “Pete” Pedrozo, USN, Judge Advocate Corps (ret.), the author of this analysis, is to provide U.S. ... to a recommendation that the United States depart from its long held position of not taking a position on competing sovereignty claims in the South China Sea. That is not the intent, nor is it one
Washington Takes a Stand in the South China Sea
/our-media/indepth/2020/09/washington-takes-a-stand-in-the-south-china-sea
In 2020, a senior U.S. government official used blunt language to publicly accuse Beijing of making unlawful maritime claims, and Washington finally began punishing companies that assist in China’s illegal island building.
Washington Takes a Stand in the South China Sea In 2020, a senior U.S. government official used blunt language to publicly accuse Beijing of making unlawful maritime claims, and Washington finally began punishing companies that assist in China’s illegal island building. /images/InDepth/Post61.jpg Washington Takes a Stand in the South China Sea 61 Rear Adm. Michael McDevitt Rear Adm. Michael ... of U.S. involvement in the South China Sea. For the first time since 2010, a senior government official used blunt language to publicly accuse Beijing of making unlawful maritime claims, and Washington
Malaysia and Brunei Claims in SCS
/reports/2014/malaysia-and-brunei-claims-in-scs
This is the second of three legal analyses commissioned as part of a project entitled, “U.S. Policy Options in the South China Sea.” The objective in asking experienced U.S international lawyers, such as Captain J. Ashley Roach, Judge Advocate General’s Corps, USN (ret.), the author of this analysis, is to provide U.S. policy makers access to work that tests the legal arguments that Vietnam, China, Malaysia and Brunei and the Philippines make in support of their claims, weigh them against the body of international case law associated with maritime disputes of this sort, and if possible, reach a judgment on which country’s claim is superior.
Malaysia and Brunei Claims in SCS Malaysia and Brunei: An Analysis of their Claims in the South China Sea This is the second of three legal analyses commissioned as part of a project entitled, “U.S. Policy Options in the South China Sea.” The objective in asking experienced U.S international lawyers, such as Captain J. Ashley Roach, Judge Advocate General’s Corps, USN (ret.), the author ... sovereignty claims in the South China Sea. That is not the intent of these legal analyses, nor is it one of the recommendations of the project. Malaysia claims seven islands or rocks in the Spratly group, two
China, Malaysia and the South China Sea
/our-media/indepth/2021/07/china-malaysia-and-the-south-china-sea
On June 1, the Royal Malaysian Air Force announced that 16 People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) aircraft, flying in “tactical formation,” had entered Malaysia's Flight Information Region.
China, Malaysia and the South China Sea On June 1, the Royal Malaysian Air Force announced that 16 People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) aircraft, flying in “tactical formation,” had entered Malaysia's Flight Information Region. /images/InDepth/Post93.jpg China, Malaysia and the South China Sea 93 Andrew Taffer and Christopher Cairns Andrew Taffer is a Research Scientist in CNA’s ... force…. [that] strictly complied with international law and didn't enter the air space of any other country.” The PLAAF’s June maneuver in the South China Sea is hardly China’s first maritime action
Long Littoral Project Bay of Bengal
/reports/2012/long-littoral-project-bay-of-bengal
This report addresses the major security issues associated with the Bay of Bengal. In this 838,600 square mile area, security threats to numerous countries, including the United States, range from disputes over exclusive economic zones to terrorism, piracy, poaching, overfishing, and trafficking of humans, arms, and narcotics. A review of the full spectrum of threats in the Bay of Bengal reveals two dominant security challenges: nascent China-India competition and the likelihood of a natural disaster. This report explores these issues in order to assess U.S. policy options for addressing each of them. It concludes by recommending ways to manage the potential for China-India strategic rivalry and to mitigate the damage of an environmental catastrophe. This is one in a series of five reports on each of the major maritime basins found along the greater Asian littoral that runs from the Sea of Japan in the east to the Arabian Sea in the west. This “long littoral” is the subject of a CNA project of the same name under the direction of CNA Senior Fellow RADM (ret.) Michael A. McDevitt. The Long Littoral project examines the five great maritime basins of the IndoPacific—the Sea of Japan, the East China and Yellow seas, the South China Sea, the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea—in order to provide a different perspective, namely a maritime viewpoint, on security issues that the United States’ “rebalance” strategy must address as it focuses on the Indo-Pacific littoral. The project also aims to identify issues that may be common to more than one basin, but involve different players in different regions, with the idea that solutions possible in one maritime basin may be applicable in others.
.) Michael A. McDevitt. The Long Littoral project examines the five great maritime basins of the IndoPacific—the Sea of Japan, the East China and Yellow seas, the South China Sea, the Bay of Bengal ... , already worried about China’s “Malacca Dilemma,” recognize that the A&N Command puts India’s naval and air power in a position to control access to the Strait of Malacca and, hence, to the South China Sea. The strongest manifestation of Sino-Indian rivalry in the Bay of Bengal has been in Burma. This is due to the confluence of both countries’ domestic and strategic interests in a neighbor
Long Littoral Project East China and Yellow Seas
/reports/2012/long-littoral-project-east-china-and-yellow-seas
Over the past two years, the South China Sea has been the most discussed East Asian maritime security issue. Still, a credible case can be made that the Yellow and East China seas have all the ingredients necessary to become another maritime center of competition in East Asia. Approximately 70 percent of China’s eastern seaboard forms the western limit of the East China Sea/Yellow Sea basin, while the Ryukyu Chain is the East China Sea’s eastern boundary. Beijing, Tokyo, Seoul and Pyongyang all have important claims of sovereignty and exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in both of these seas. Disputes over seabed resources and fishing occur frequently among all three.
Long Littoral Project East China and Yellow Seas The Long Littoral Project: East China and Yellow Seas | A Maritime Perspective on Indo-Pacific Security Over the past two years, the South China Sea ... basins of the Indo-Pacific Oceans: the Sea of Japan, the East China and Yellow seas, the South China Sea, the Bay of Bengal, and the Arabian Sea. Together these reports are the main element ... center of competition in East Asia. Approximately 70 percent of China’s eastern seaboard forms the western limit of the East China Sea/Yellow Sea basin, while the Ryukyu Chain is the East China Sea’s
Bangladesh vs India Positive Order in Public Sea
/reports/2017/bangladesh-vs-india-positive-order-in-public-sea
In the last five years, two international arbitrations have resolved decades-old maritime boundary disputes in the Bay of Bengal. The first, between Bangladesh and Myanmar, was resolved in March 2012 by the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS). The second, between Bangladesh and India, was resolved in 2014 by a tribunal of the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) in The Hague. An earlier CNA study analyzed the Bangladesh v. Myanmar case and its implications for future maritime disputes. This study follows that up with an overview of the Bangladesh v. India case history, a legal assessment of the ruling, and an analysis of the implications of the ruling for India-Bangladesh bilateral relations, maritime disputes in the South China Sea and elsewhere, and for U.S. oceans policy.
for India-Bangladesh bilateral relations, maritime disputes in the South China Sea and elsewhere, and for U.S. oceans policy. In 2014, a tribunal of the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA ... Bangladesh vs India Positive Order in Public Sea Bangladesh v. India: A Positive Step Forward in Public Order of the Seas In the last five years, two international arbitrations have resolved decades-old maritime boundary disputes in the Bay of Bengal. The first, between Bangladesh and Myanmar, was resolved in March 2012 by the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS). The second
pla update: Issue 3, April 4, 2022
/our-media/newsletters/pla-update/issue-3
A monthly newsletter focused on the internal and external affairs of the PLA
exercise involving a four-ship PLA Navy task force underway in the South China Sea, East Indian Ocean, and Western Pacific. According to China Military Online and CCTV-7 , PLA Southern Theater ... ?), China Military Online (中国军网), Mar. 1, 2022, https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/iHpkiGPm4K1QtmSup25uNw. [64] “Xinjiang, 5,000 Meters above Sea Level, Excellent Vehicle-Borne Soldiers Are Forged ... on the expertise of CNA's China and Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Division to gather information and provide an update on important developments in the PLA as reported in the Chinese- and English-language