skip to main content
ArticlePodcastReportQuick LookVideotriangleplus sign dropdown arrow Case Study All Newsfeed

Search Results

Your search for Maritime Security found 93 results.

Maritime Security Strengthening International Cooperation
/reports/2009/maritime-security-strengthening-international-cooperation
Headlines around the world today describe the dramatic rising tide of criminal behaviour at sea: piracy off the coast of Africa, illegal immigration across the Mediterranean, and the flood of narcotics into Africa and Europe from across the Atlantic, to name only a few. Some experts estimate that currently 12 percent of all maritime activities take place ‘on the dark side.’ As these activities increase in number and spread to new locations across the globe, we are beginning to witness the detrimental economic and security impact throughout the world. The rise in illicit activity at sea affects not only developed nations that rely on free access to maritime shipping lanes for their economic success and prosperity, but also underdeveloped, vulnerable nations whose weak infrastructure and internal economic and political stability are placed under even greater duress. With these challenges in mind, this conference addressed critical questions on how to improve global maritime security. Speakers tackled issues such as the evolving nature of risks and threats in the maritime environment; the current gaps in the gathering, the sharing and the analysis of information; bilateral, regional, and international legal frameworks for maritime security; and the role leading maritime powers and multinational organisations can play in assisting developing countries to build capacity for securing their coastal areas. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions on these topics and concludes with a set of implications and considerations for maritime stakeholders.
Maritime Security Strengthening International Cooperation Maritime Security: Strengthening International and Interagency Cooperation Headlines around the world today describe the dramatic rising tide ... are beginning to witness the detrimental economic and security impact throughout the world. The rise in illicit activity at sea affects not only developed nations that rely on free access to maritime ... greater duress. With these challenges in mind, this conference addressed critical questions on how to improve global maritime security. Speakers tackled issues such as the evolving nature of risks
Assessment of CBSI Partner Nation Capabilities for Maritime Security and Law Enforcement
/reports/2022/08/assessment-of-cbsi-partner-nation-capabilities-for-maritime-security-and-law-enforcement
CNA assessed the current maritime security and law enforcement capabilities of the for twelve of the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CNSI) partner nations: Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago; as well as two Caribbean cooperative security institutions: CARICOM IMPACS and the Regional Security System. These assessments are concise snapshots of partner capabilities relevant to the goals of INL CBSI as of March 2022.
Assessment of CBSI Partner Nation Capabilities for Maritime Security and Law Enforcement Assessment of CBSI Partner Nation Capabilities for Maritime Security and Law Enforcement CNA assessed the current maritime security and law enforcement capabilities of the for twelve of the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CNSI) partner nations: Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica ... of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement (INL) asked CNA for independent assessments of the current maritime security and law enforcement capabilities of Caribbean Basin Security Initiative
Maintaining the US led International Order
/reports/2020/06/maintaining-the-us-led-international-order
Maritime security operations sustain and enforce the rule of law and good order at sea. Yet in an era of great power competition (GPC), do those activities support national strategy? This paper offers a structure for answering that question, placing maritime security in the context of GPC by describing competition as a function of control for the international system. The framework introduced in this paper demonstrates that maritime security is an important component of maintaining a system that benefits US security and prosperity. The framework also shows that there are two roles for maritime security in GPC—avoiding corrosion of the US-led system by great powers and avoiding corrosion caused by lesser powers. These two approaches have different implications for Navy deployment, procurement, and employment policy. Consequently, although our analysis suggests that maritime security is integral to GPC, its roles can vary, pulling resources in divergent directions according to policy priorities.
Maintaining the US led International Order Maritime Security and Great Power Competition: Maintaining the US-led International Order Maritime security operations sustain and enforce the rule of law ... security in the context of GPC by describing competition as a function of control for the international system. The framework introduced in this paper demonstrates that maritime security is an important component of maintaining a system that benefits US security and prosperity. The framework also shows that there are two roles for maritime security in GPC—avoiding corrosion of the US-led system by great
Long Littoral Project East China and Yellow Seas
/reports/2012/long-littoral-project-east-china-and-yellow-seas
Over the past two years, the South China Sea has been the most discussed East Asian maritime security issue. Still, a credible case can be made that the Yellow and East China seas have all the ingredients necessary to become another maritime center of competition in East Asia. Approximately 70 percent of China’s eastern seaboard forms the western limit of the East China Sea/Yellow Sea basin, while the Ryukyu Chain is the East China Sea’s eastern boundary. Beijing, Tokyo, Seoul and Pyongyang all have important claims of sovereignty and exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in both of these seas. Disputes over seabed resources and fishing occur frequently among all three.
Long Littoral Project East China and Yellow Seas The Long Littoral Project: East China and Yellow Seas | A Maritime Perspective on Indo-Pacific Security Over the past two years, the South China Sea has been the most discussed East Asian maritime security issue. Still, a credible case can be made that the Yellow and East China seas have all the ingredients necessary to become another maritime ... frequently among all three. This report addresses the major security issues associated with the East China and Yellow seas. It is one in a series of five reports, that examines the five great maritime
North American Maritime Homeland Security
/reports/2004/north-american-maritime-homeland-security
The CNA Corporation (CNAC) has been involved in this issue since well before the attacks of September 11th, 2001, and has provided direct support to the Global War On Terror, both overseas and domestically since the attacks. Additionally, CNAC has provided support to U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) planning and programming in recent years.
North American Maritime Homeland Security “North American Maritime Homeland Security and Defense” A CNA Corporation Workshop The CNA Corporation (CNAC) has been involved in this issue since well ... Coast Guard (USCG) planning and programming in recent years. Participants reached consensus on several points. First, maritime homeland security amounts to an unfunded mandate imposed by the federal government on state and local governments, and on the many maritime terminal and Port Authorities. Transformation of port and shipping operations to account for terrorist threats represents a huge
Plans and Strategy
/expertise/plans-and-strategy
As global power has shifted, as new warfighting domains have opened up, CNA has flexed and expanded its analytical expertise to meet the needs of the Navy, Marine Corps and Department of Defense. But throughout these evolutions, we have maintained a constant focus on the nation’s most capable adversaries. Our approach to great power competition is holistic, ranging from strategic analysis to tactical evaluation. Today, our scientists analyze operations and tactics across an ever-expanding range of warfare domains. Beyond the surface, air and undersea commands we have closely supported for decades, CNA is staying ahead of the latest threats with our Center for Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence and our Cyber Research Program. Great powers are constantly adapting. So is CNA.
half large Maritime Security and Great Power Competition: Maintaining the US-Led International Order /reports/2009/maritime-security-strengthening-international-cooperation Maritime Security and Great Power Competition: Maintaining the US-Led International Order Maritime security operations support national strategy by sustaining and enforcing the rule of law and good order at sea. This avoids ... of past decades. These include Sea Plan 2000, the Maritime Strategy of the 1980s, Project SIXTY, Forward . . . From the Sea, The Way Ahead, A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower
cna talks: The War For Muddy Waters: The Future of Maritime Security
/our-media/podcasts/cna-talks/2019/6/the-war-for-muddy-waters-the-future-of-maritime-security
In this episode of CNA Talks, Joshua Tallis sits down with Elizabeth Cutler to discuss his new book, "The War for Muddy Waters." Tallis articulates the need to conceptualize maritime security through a single framework, rather than as a series of individual threats, such as piracy and drug trafficking. He applies theories traditionally used in criminology to maritime security challenges, examining approaches to prevent crime as a whole rather than focusing on different types of crime.
The War For Muddy Waters: The Future of Maritime Security In this episode of CNA Talks, Joshua Tallis sits down with Elizabeth Cutler to discuss his new book, "The War for Muddy Waters." Tallis articulates the need to conceptualize maritime security through a single framework, rather than as a series of individual threats, such as piracy and drug trafficking. He applies theories traditionally used in criminology to maritime security challenges, examining approaches to prevent crime as a whole rather than focusing on different types of crime. The War For Muddy Waters: The Future of Maritime
cna talks: Maritime Security in Asia
/our-media/podcasts/cna-talks/2017/maritime-security-in-asia
Dr. Dov Zakheim sits down with three CNA experts to discuss maritime issues in Asia. Bringing together a wealth of research knowledge and real-world experience in the region, Rear Admiral Michael McDevitt, U.S. Navy (ret), Mark Rosen and Catherine Lea discuss China’s maritime capabilities, the South and East China Seas, relations between the Philippines, China and the United States, Russia’s role in Asia, the relationship between the Indian Navy and the U.S. Navy and much more.
Maritime Security in Asia Dr. Dov Zakheim sits down with three CNA experts to discuss maritime issues in Asia. Bringing together a wealth of research knowledge and real-world experience ... and the United States, Russia’s role in Asia, the relationship between the Indian Navy and the U.S. Navy and much more. Maritime Security in Asia Biographies Dr. Dov Zakheim, host of the episode ... ) is a senior fellow at CNA. He is an expert on maritime security issues along the Indo-Pacific littoral and the maritime dimension of China’s national strategy. During his navy career, Rear Admiral
Long Littoral Project Bay of Bengal
/reports/2012/long-littoral-project-bay-of-bengal
This report addresses the major security issues associated with the Bay of Bengal. In this 838,600 square mile area, security threats to numerous countries, including the United States, range from disputes over exclusive economic zones to terrorism, piracy, poaching, overfishing, and trafficking of humans, arms, and narcotics. A review of the full spectrum of threats in the Bay of Bengal reveals two dominant security challenges: nascent China-India competition and the likelihood of a natural disaster. This report explores these issues in order to assess U.S. policy options for addressing each of them. It concludes by recommending ways to manage the potential for China-India strategic rivalry and to mitigate the damage of an environmental catastrophe. This is one in a series of five reports on each of the major maritime basins found along the greater Asian littoral that runs from the Sea of Japan in the east to the Arabian Sea in the west. This “long littoral” is the subject of a CNA project of the same name under the direction of CNA Senior Fellow RADM (ret.) Michael A. McDevitt. The Long Littoral project examines the five great maritime basins of the IndoPacific—the Sea of Japan, the East China and Yellow seas, the South China Sea, the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea—in order to provide a different perspective, namely a maritime viewpoint, on security issues that the United States’ “rebalance” strategy must address as it focuses on the Indo-Pacific littoral. The project also aims to identify issues that may be common to more than one basin, but involve different players in different regions, with the idea that solutions possible in one maritime basin may be applicable in others.
Long Littoral Project Bay of Bengal The Long Littoral Project: Bay of Bengal A Maritime Perspective on Indo-Pacific Security This report addresses the major security issues associated with the Bay ... and the Arabian Sea—in order to provide a different perspective, namely a maritime viewpoint, on security issues that the United States’ “rebalance” strategy must address as it focuses ... maritime basin may be applicable in others. China’s economic and security interests have resulted in a greater Chinese presence in the Indian Ocean region, much to the concern of India. China has
Deterrence and Influence Navys Role
/reports/2009/deterrence-and-influence-navys-role
Deterrence is one of the primary mechanisms of war prevention, and the rise of a new breed of security challenges since the end of the Cold War requires updated deterrence strategies that combine both kinetic and non-kinetic capabilities, and are designed to influence actors at the earliest phases of the conflict spectrum. Our objective is to analyze how U.S. non-nuclear capabilities can be used to deter conventional aggression, and to examine the role of maritime power in preventing conventional conflicts.
Deterrence and Influence Navys Role Deterrence and Influence: The Navy’s Role in Preventing War Deterrence is one of the primary mechanisms of war prevention, and the rise of a new breed of security ... of the conflict spectrum. Our objective is to analyze how U.S. non-nuclear capabilities can be used to deter conventional aggression, and to examine the role of maritime power in preventing conventional conflicts. A central tenet of the U.S. Navy’s new Maritime Strategy is that preventing wars is as important as winning wars. This emphasis on war prevention has generated new research on maritime