CNA Policing Tip Sheet

Community policing, transparency and officer safety are central tenets of a successful policing reform program in the United States, say policing experts from CNA.

"The lack of transparency and failure to communicate the facts surrounding police involved shootings continues to feed the informal account of continued injustice at the hands of the police. We need to focus on rebuilding the trust and legitimacy of police in the community through independent investigations of police use of force and careful study and use of body-worn cameras," says CHIPS Stewart, director of public safety in CNA’s Safety and Security division.

Officer safety is also a critical component for reform. According to a 2015 CNA report funded by the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, while the number of ambush attacks per year against law enforcement officers held steady between the early 1990s and 2013, the proportion of fatal attacks on officers attributable to ambushes increased.

"There is a strong relationship between all the reform recommendations from the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing and the recommendations regarding officer safety," says Chip Coldren, managing director of the Justice Group in CNA’s Safety and Security division. "The bottom line is that if you take care of the officers, you take care of the community. There must be a commitment to officer safety. We have to pay as much attention to this as we do to the other reforms."

Laura Kunard, senior research scientist in CNA’s Safety and Security division, says, "The evolution of policing in America really depends upon a critical issue: trust. Community members, officers and government officials must find ways to build trust with each other – by getting to know one another and working together. Trust is the key to making progress on the difficult public safety problems facing us."

Dr. James "Chip" Coldren is managing director of the Justice Group in CNA’s Safety and Security division. He has over 35 years of research experience with justice system reform, evaluation of police, crime prevention, corrections, juvenile justice and restorative justice programs.

James "CHIPS" Stewart is director of public safety in CNA’s Safety and Security division. CHIPS is a nationally recognized expert in criminal justice system assessment, community policing, use of force and collaborative reform.

Dr. Laura Kunard is a senior research scientist for justice programs in CNA’s Safety and Security division. Laura is an experienced researcher, project manager and police trainer with expertise in police reform, police interactions with people with mental illness and procedural justice practices.

To arrange interviews with these experts, contact Fiona Gettinger (gettingerf@cna.org; 703-824-2388).

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About CNA

CNA is a non-profit research and analysis organization dedicated to developing actionable solutions to complex problems of national importance. With more than 600 scientists, analysts and support staff, CNA takes a real-world approach to gathering data with its one-of-a-kind field program that places analysts on battleships and military bases, in squad rooms and classrooms, and working side-by-side with a wide array of government decisions-makers around the world. In addition to defense-related matters for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, CNA’s research portfolio includes policing, homeland security, climate change, water resources, education and air traffic management. www.cna.org

CNA is a nonprofit research and analysis organization dedicated to developing actionable solutions to complex problems of national importance. With nearly 700 scientists, analysts and professional staff, CNA takes a real-world approach to gathering data. Its one-of-a-kind field program places analysts on carriers and military bases, in squad rooms and classrooms, and working side-by-side with a wide array of government decision-makers around the world. In addition to defense-related matters for the U.S. Department of the Navy, CNA’s research portfolio includes criminal justice, homeland security, energy security, water resources, enterprise systems and data analysis, and education.

Note to writers and editors: CNA is not an acronym and is correctly referenced as "CNA, a research organization in Arlington, VA."


Contact

Fiona Gettinger
Communications Specialist
703.824.2388
gettingerf@cna.org

communications@cna.org
3003 Washington Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201